Pet Funerals

People with pets dispose of their deceased animals' remains in different ways, but if they live in the city the options are obviously more limited. With a number of reasons for this increase in activity linking back to a shortage in burial spaces, as well as people wanting to keep their pets with them when they move house, and an overall shift in attitudes towards the accepted levels of the grieving process over fallen pets.
In 2004, 1.1 million Japanese died (2003: 1.0 million), a number that is expected to rise in the future due to the increase of the average age in Japan; see demographics of Japan Funeral Business Monthly estimates that there will be 1.7 million deaths by 2035, and revenue of 2 trillion yen in 2040.



Particularly notorious are mobile dog crematoria that advertise their service for ¥50,000 and then perform the cremation in an incinerator in the back of a truck and demand ¥300,000 because optional” items and tell customer if they pay up the bone of their dog will be broken into little bits.
In order to prepare remains, two documents must be obtained from the Japanese authorities. Another service on offer is having a Buddhist priest read a sutra aloud just before a pet's body is cremated. At present, three temples in Thailand offer daily services for pet funerals, including cremation, a Buddhist ceremony by a monk, and scattering the ashes in a river to signify the return of the earthly remains to nature.

A cremation usually takes about two hours, and the family returns at a scheduled time when the cremation has been completed. The idea is to console the soul of a deceased pet, as well as help owners accept its death and move on with their lives. Separate cremation is the most common type of cremation for owners who want the ashes returned.
A Japanese psychiatrist told the Yomiuri Shimbun that weaker relations among family members and people having fewer children has lead some pet owners to perceive their pets as becoming more important than family members and people in general. The idea of a human and a pet being reunited after death, they say, makes no sense according to Buddhist precepts.
Japanese people are generally very much against putting their pets to sleep. Pets today are regarded by many as full-fledged members of the family, enjoying an equal—and in certain cases higher—status as human members of a household. Displaying your special family member's remains is a beautiful way to memorialize them for a lifetime.

Research by Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology indicated the average age of dogs rose from 8.6 years in the early 1990s to 11.9 in the early 2000s and the average age of cats rose from 5.1 year to 11.9 years in the same period. If owners who allow their pet inside for part of the time were also included, then the figures grew to 89.1% for dogs and 96.9% for cats.
Recognizing the issue, South Korea's Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs plans to conduct a series of inspections and crackdowns on unauthorized animal cremation ペット 霊園 services in association with local governments. If you are planning to understand the Cremation Furnace market in and out, then this is a must have report.

TOKYO — With an increasing number of distraught pet lovers seeking to mark the passing of their cherished animal friends with a funeral service, the range of relevant services on offer has grown considerably. We're wanting to find a cremation service and keep her ashes, so any advice is appreciated.
The Bio-Response machine has room for up to 20 domestic pets at a time, each in its own compartment. These services will pick up the body at your home and later bring back the ashes; or, more precisely, the bones, since cremation in Japan—even for humans—doesn't usually get as far as ashes, which entails another, different cremation process.

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